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FAQs

What are paraffinic fuels?

Why are they better than traditional fuels?

Does one need a special engine technology to use paraffinic fuels?

What additional infrastructure is needed to implement paraffinic fuels?

Do paraffinic fuels help the European economy?

Why was ASFE founded?

ASFE is the alliance for "synthetic fuels" but you promote "paraffinic fuels" – what is the difference between the two?

What has ASFE done so far to introduce paraffinic fuels in Europe?

 


 

What are paraffinic fuels?

Paraffinic Fuels are clean diesel fuels, with near zero sulphur and aromatics, and their use in diesel vehicles could lower local emissions. They are made with the Fischer Tropsch process from natural gas (GTL) or biomass (BTL), or through hydrotreatment process from vegetable oils or animal fats (HVO).

Why are they better than traditional fuels?

Using paraffinic fuels in diesel engines reduce particulate matter (PM), NOx, SOx and hydrocarbons (HC) compared to conventional diesel. Paraffinic fuels can help reduce local emissions especially in urban zones.

Does one need a special engine technology to use paraffinic fuels?

No -- Paraffinic fuels can be used in existing diesel vehicles (passenger cars, commercial vehicles and heavy duty) without modifications.

What additional infrastructure is needed to implement paraffinic fuels?

No dedicated infrastructure is required. As paraffinic fuels can be used neat or blended in existing diesel engines, distribution and refuelling infrastructure, no additional upfront investment from consumers or the government is required.

Do paraffinic fuels help the European economy?

Yes. Much of the technology around paraffinic fuels was created by European companies, with significant ongoing research taking place in Europe.

As the gas and biomass feedstocks for paraffinic fuels come from a variety of geographies around the world, they also broaden Europe's energy mix.

Why was ASFE founded?

With the endorsement of the European Commission, leading car manufacturers and fuel producers came together in 2006 to form ASFE, an alliance to promote the awareness, development and use of paraffinic fuels in Europe.

ASFE is the alliance for "synthetic fuels" but you promote "paraffinic fuels" – what is the difference between the two?

When ASFE was first established we focused on BTL and GTL (technically "synthetic fuels"), though HVO is an example of a fuel almost identical in composition and performance. BTL, GTL and HVO are all classified as paraffinic fuels, and ASFE now supports the application of all fuels of identical composition that are classified as paraffinic fuels.

What has ASFE done so far to introduce paraffinic fuels in Europe?

ASFE members have spent decades researching paraffinic fuels, ensuring that they perform well, provide emissions benefits, and work well in existing diesel technologies. Through constructing world-class plants with leading technologies, they have made commercially available both GTL and HVO. These fuels are now available to citizens in Europe.

At European level ASFE has promoted the benefits of paraffinic fuels to EU policy makers and ensured that they are now considered an alternative fuel. ASFE has been advocating for barriers to the introduction of paraffinic fuels to be removed and for fuels to be incentivised on the basis of their environmental performance.